After 13 years as a litigator in the City, Rachael Talibart left the profession.

She acquired two more degrees (one an MA in Victorian Literature and Art) and became a full time, fine art photographer.

A specialist in coastal imagery, Talibart doesn’t simply record a recognisable place.

Instead, she aims to show the one thing in a scene that appeals to her: to convey how it felt to be there in that moment.

Working in black and white helps Talibart to achieve simplicity and atmosphere in her work and she’s won multiple awards in this field, including Black and White Photographer of the Year 2018.

It is perhaps contrary to photograph the Northern Lights in black and white but I never like to follow the crowd

This striking image of Kirkjufell, Iceland, was taken in the middle of a cold January night.

Typically, the 463m-high mountain is depicted in colour with a waterfall in the foreground and aurora overhead.

Talibart, however, presents it in monochrome with its reflection in the lake and a handful of stars behind the aurora: “It is perhaps contrary to photograph the Northern Lights in black and white but I never like to follow the crowd!”

In doing so, she’s created a beautiful, otherworldly scene and its film-reference title, Sorting Hat, only adds to the magical nature of the image.

View on Instagram

Talibart has a solo show, ‘Tides + Tempests’, at the Sohn Fine Art Gallery in Lenox, MA until 29 September 2019.

For more information, see rachaeltalibart.com